Am I Sam?

 Tutor Momo Chapa and NHR student Alexandra Romero-Rodriguez. Lucy Gellman Photos. 

Tutor Momo Chapa and NHR student Alexandra Romero-Rodriguez. Lucy Gellman Photos. 

Isaiah Nixon did a double take the first time he saw green eggs and ham come out of his grade school cafeteria. He’d grown accustomed to new lunch options—beef that looked strange, baked fish three different ways, macaroni and cheese of questionable provenance. But this was a first. 

He did what any hungry, cautious but curious kid would to. He took his fork, looked around to his friends with a blink of approval, and dug in. 

Earlier this week, students at New Haven Reads told their own stories of green eggs and ham, foxes in socks, cats in hats and grinches stealing Christmas as they celebrated Dr. Seuss, whose March 2 birthday doubles as the National Endowment for the Arts’s (NEA) Read Across America day. 

 Dixwell Site Director Coralys De Jesus on "Wacky Wednesday." 

Dixwell Site Director Coralys De Jesus on "Wacky Wednesday." 

They brought new outlooks to the beloved author, whose work has withstood the test of time. Like Nixon, who spoke about eating green eggs and ham at school after reading the book. 

“Am I really seeing green eggs and ham?,” he recalled thinking on a short episode of WNHH’s “Kitchen Sync” program. “It was actually really good … it was 20 kids, all 20 of them had actually ate it.”

Or Alexandra Romero-Rodriguez, a student at Beecher School who said she’s drawn to Seuss’ titular black-and-white cat in his tall, striped headwear. She’s never tried green eggs and ham. But that wouldn’t stop her if she was given the option, she said. 

“I think it would taste kind of bad,” she said. “And spicy.”

To listen to different student takes on Dr. Seuss—his books and his legacy—click on or download the audio above. It’s also available in podcast form on iTunes